The Northeast Regional Food Guide is a new nutrition education tool that helps consumers in the Northeastern United States choose a nutritious diet that promotes health and supports an active life. In addition to these nutrition and health goals, the Northeast Regional Food Guide encourages Northeasterners to eat foods grown in their region. By eating more of the foods grown and processed closer to home, consumers can help the local economy, support local farmers, and promote a sustainable, local food system, while enjoying a varied and delicious diet. The Guide is available through Cornell University Cooperative Extension.

The Northeast Regional Food Guide consists of a full color information poster, a seasonal produce guide, and a set of eight fact sheets.The poster, with its food pyramid and seasonal lists, will help consumers learn more about eating a healthy, seasonal diet of northeastern foods. The fact sheets provide additional information related to nutrition, tips on using seasonal produce, information about northeast food production, a seasonal regional quiz, and ideas for nutritional educators and food service managers.

All food guides represent our current understanding of the relationship between food choices and health, but few are specific to a particular region of the country.

The foods we choose have an important impact on our health, on local agriculture, and on the natural environment.

The Northeast Regional Food Guide helps you select a healthful diet from the wide variety of foods emphasizing those that are produced and processed in the Northeast.

One way to improve the market for northeastern farmers is to eat more of the foods they grow. By using the Northeastern Regional Food Guide you will improve the nutritional quality of your diet while supporting your local food system - northeastern agricultural producers and processors.

A survey of consumers in the northeast indicated a preference for locally produced foods, and a concern about the region's farmers, farmland, and the resources used to transport food great distances.

Studies also reveal that consumer knowledge of their local food and agriculture system is limited. The Northeast Regional Food Guide helps people understand what foods come from the area in which they live as well as the seasonal variation of fruit and vegetable availability.

This food guide is useful to nutrition educators, dietitians, food service directors, commodity and agriculture organizations, food retailers, direct markets, farmers' markets, public schools, and food retailers. This guide can be displayed in nutrition and health clinics, supermarkets, food coops, farmers' markets, school, college, and university cafeterias, and home kitchens, to remind people of what foods are available from the northeastern region. Finally, anyone who eats in the northeast should find this guide useful!


Seasonal Produce Lists

Because of the varied climate in the Northeast, different fruits and vegetables are available at different times of the year. In the winter, emphasize canned, frozen, dried, and stored produce in your diet, as well as year-round produce such as sprouts and mushrooms. During the spring, summer, and fall enjoy our region's abundant fresh produce.

Seasonal Produce Lists:

Spring

Spring is the time to enjoy a wide diversity of nutritious greens, several other vegetables, and the year's first fruits.

Vegetables
asparagus
beets
broccoli
cabbage
cauliflower
fiddleheads
garlic greens
greens
arugula
beet
bok choy
chard
collard
cress
dandelion
kale
mizuna
mustard greens
sorrel
tat soi
turnip
lettuce
mushrooms
parsnips
peas - snap and snow
radishes
rhubarb
spinach
sprouts


Fruits
apples
strawberries


Seasonings
chives
cilantro
dill
marjoram
mint
oregano
parsley
sage
thyme



Summer

Summer is the peak of the season for many northeastern fruits and a great time to enjoy a wide variety of fresh vegetables.

Vegetables
beets
broccoli
cabbage
carrots
cauliflower
celery
cucumbers
eggplant
endive
fennel
garlic
green beans

*kohlrabi1
lettuce
mushrooms
okra
onions - red and yellow
peppers - hot and sweet
potatoes - new
radicchio
scallions
sprouts
summer squash
sweet corn
tomatoes


*available early in this season only

Fruits
apricots
blackberries
blueberries
cherries
currants
elderberries
gooseberries
melons
nectarines
peaches
plums
raspberries


Seasonings
basil
cilantro
dill
marjoram
mint
parsley
rosemary
savory
tarragon



Fall

Fall, the traditional harvest season, is the time to enjoy the bounty of northeastern fruits and vegetables.

Vegetables
beets
broccoli
Brussels sprouts
burdock (gobo)
cabbage
carrots 1
cauliflower
celeriac
daikon 1
fennel
garlic 1
greens
arugula
beet
bok choy
chard
collard
kale
mustard greens
mizuna tat soi
turnip
horseradish1
kohlrabi
leeks
lettuce
mushrooms
onions - red and yellow 1
parsley
parsnips
potatoes 1
pumpkins
radishes
rutabaga
scallions
shallots 1
sprouts
sweet potatoes
turnips
winter squash 1


Fruits
apples 1
apple cider 1
Asian pears
cranberries
grapes
pears 1
quince
raspberries


Seasonings
Season with herbs dried from the spring and summer harvests.


1This is the peak harvest season. However, this fruit or vegetable can be found in other seasons stored from local sources.


Winter At this time of year a wide variety of northeastern foods can be found canned, frozen, dried, and stored.

Vegetables
beets
burdock (gobo)
cabbage
carrots
celeriac
daikon1
garlic
horseradish
Jerusalem artichoke
kale 2
kohlrabi 2
leeks 2
mushrooms
onions - red and yellow
parsnips
potatoes
rutabagas
shallots
sprouts
sweet potatoes
turnips
winter squash


Fruits
apples
apple cider
pears


Seasonings
Season with herbs dried from the spring and summer harvests.

1 This is the peak harvest season. However, this fruit or vegetable can be found in other seasons stored from local sources.

2 Available early in this season only.